Doomsday glacier melting rapidly due to global warming

Doomsday glacier melting rapidly due to global warming

Doomsday glacier: Scientists are concerned about glacier melting as a result of rising temperatures, or global warming. In Antarctica, the Thwaites Glacier is also rapidly melting. A group of 32 scientists left on Thursday to investigate this glacier.

AP reports from Stockholm. Scientists are concerned about glacier melting and rising sea levels as a result of rising temperatures, or global warming. Glaciers contain so much ice that if even a small portion of it melts, a large portion of the world will be submerged. Antarctica’s Thwaites Glacier is also known for its massive ice. A group of 32 scientists left on Thursday to investigate this glacier.

Uncertainty about rising water levels

“How the sea level will rise in the future is a source of uncertainty,” said Anna Wellin, an oceanographer at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden. Thwaites has a significant role to play in this haziness. It is extremely unstable, which is a cause for concern.

The study will yield valuable information.

The American research ship has left with a group of 32 scientists. Scientists will travel to a location that has never been visited by a group of scientists before. In 2019, a team attempted to reach that side, but they were unable to reach the glacier’s edge. This time, scientists will look at the temperature of the water, the sea surface, and the thickness of the ice. During this time, the cracks in the ice will be examined as well.

The largest glacier on the planet

The Thwaites Glacier in Antarctica is the world’s largest glacier. It covers an area of 1.92 million square kilometres. Its area is the same as Gujarat’s. Given the amount of ice it contains and the risk of sea level rise caused by it, it is also known as Doomsday Glacier. According to statistics, 50 billion tonnes of ice melts and mixes into the sea each year from Thwaites. Thaws account for 4% of the world’s rising sea level, according to the British Antarctic Survey.

glass-like surface cracking

The ground part of this glacier, according to Irene Petit of Oregon State University, is losing its grip. This can result in a large portion of the ice reaching the sea, where it will gradually melt and cause havoc. Aside from that, its icy surface is cracking like car glass, which is cause for concern. In just one year, cracks up to 10 kilometres long have appeared.